Using the Reading Tool

Using the Reading Tool
Photo by Alicia Christin Gerald / Unsplash

Most of my lessons are in English, but it is possible to use the reading tool to start learning other languages. I like to create a “word puzzle” for new languages. For example, if you are new to Japanese, you can ask an AI like Bing Chat to produce 5 simple sentences that use the verb “to speak” in Japanese. Then, paste the output into the reading tool. Listen to each sentence and try to figure out which word means “to speak.” You’ll learn a new word and get lots of context that your brain will file away for later use.

私は日本語を話します。
彼女は英語を話します。
彼はフランス語を話します。
私たちはスペイン語を話します。
あなたは何語を話しますか?

私は日本語を話します。
彼女は英語を話します。
彼はフランス語を話します。
私たちはスペイン語を話します。
あなたは何語を話しますか

Click for Learning Tips

Here are some tips for getting the most out of this site.


Beginners: My strategy is to first read the translation while listening to the audio. Then I listen to each sentence individually. After that, I practice saying the vocabulary words out loud. Finally, I listen to the whole text again without reading the translation. I don't try to remember or understand everything. I just let the language sink in as I gain more exposure. (Videos about Comprehensible Input)


Intermediate Learners: To gain some speaking practice, try opening the translation in your native language and then translate it back into the language you're learning. If you encounter any difficulties, you can refer to the transcripts.


Although you may use these lessons for short, intense study sessions, it's important for intermediate learners to engage in extensive listening and reading with simple books, TV shows, and podcasts as soon as possible.

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