Bilingualism and Dementia

Bilingualism and Dementia
Photo by Robina Weermeijer / Unsplash
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Dementia
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According to a recent study published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, speaking two or more languages could have benefits for our health, particularly for our memory later in life. The study found that those who reported using two languages daily from a young age performed better on learning and memory tests than those who spoke only one language. This supports previous studies that suggest bilingualism has positive effects against cognitive decline. Neuroscientists believe that bilingual individuals may be able to apply similar strategies used when switching between languages to other areas, such as managing emotions or multitasking. This could help delay the onset of dementia.
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According to a recent study published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, speaking two or more languages could have benefits for our health, particularly for our memory later in life. The study found that those who reported using two languages daily from a young age performed better on learning and memory tests than those who spoke only one language. This supports previous studies that suggest bilingualism has positive effects against cognitive decline. Neuroscientists believe that bilingual individuals may be able to apply similar strategies used when switching between languages to other areas, such as managing emotions or multitasking. This could help delay the onset of dementia.
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according to published journal neurobiology benefits performed memory previous bilingualism positive effect congnitive decline neuroscientists individuals strategies apply similar switching emotions multitasking delay onset dementia
Le bilinguisme pourrait retarder les premiers signes de démence
Les résultats d’une nouvelle étude viennent renforcer cette hypothèse vielle de deux décennies.
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Beginners: My strategy is to first read the translation while listening to the audio. Then I listen to each sentence individually. After that, I practice saying the vocabulary words out loud. Finally, I listen to the whole text again without reading the translation. I don't try to remember or understand everything. I just let the language sink in as I gain more exposure. (Videos about Comprehensible Input)


Intermediate Learners: To gain some speaking practice, try opening the translation in your native language and then translate it back into the language you're learning. If you encounter any difficulties, you can refer to the transcripts.


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