Can We Live Forever?

Can We Live Forever?
Photo by SpaceX / Unsplash

Easier Version

Longevity escape velocity (LEV) is an idea that says we might be able to live forever if science can find ways to help us live longer faster than we get older. This means that for every year we live, science could help us live more than one year longer. This way, we could keep living longer and longer. A scientist named Aubrey de Grey first talked about this idea. He said that if we can fix the things that make our bodies get old, we could live for a very long time. Some people think this idea might work with new discoveries in medicine and technology. But it’s still just an idea and some people don’t agree with it.
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Longevity escape velocity (LEV) is an idea that says we might be able to live forever if science can find ways to help us live longer faster than we get older. This means that for every year we live, science could help us live more than one year longer. This way, we could keep living longer and longer. A scientist named Aubrey de Grey first talked about this idea. He said that if we can fix the things that make our bodies get old, we could live for a very long time. Some people think this idea might work with new discoveries in medicine and technology. But it’s still just an idea and some people don’t agree with it.
Vocabulary
longevity escape velocity idea forever live longer faster older year scientist fix bodies might work discoveries medicine technology still agree
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Normal Version

Longevity escape velocity (LEV) is a hypothetical concept in which the rate of medical advances and life-extending technologies is faster than the rate at which we age. This means that for every year that we live, science would be able to extend our life expectancy by more than a year, allowing us to continually increase our lifespan and potentially achieve immortality. The idea of longevity escape velocity was first proposed by biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey, who argued that if we can develop the technology to repair and rejuvenate the damage that accumulates in our bodies as we age, we could potentially extend our lifespan indefinitely. While the concept of longevity escape velocity is still largely theoretical and controversial, some researchers believe that it may be possible to achieve through advances in fields such as regenerative medicine, gene therapy, and artificial intelligence.
Listen Line-by-Line
Longevity escape velocity (LEV) is a hypothetical concept in which the rate of medical advances and life-extending technologies is faster than the rate at which we age. This means that for every year that we live, science would be able to extend our life expectancy by more than a year, allowing us to continually increase our lifespan and potentially achieve immortality. The idea of longevity escape velocity was first proposed by biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey, who argued that if we can develop the technology to repair and rejuvenate the damage that accumulates in our bodies as we age, we could potentially extend our lifespan indefinitely. While the concept of longevity escape velocity is still largely theoretical and controversial, some researchers believe that it may be possible to achieve through advances in fields such as regenerative medicine, gene therapy, and artificial intelligence.
Vocabulary
longevity escape velocity medical advances life-extending technologies rate extend life expectancy lifespan potentially achieve immortality biomedical gerontologist rejuventate repair accumulates indefinitely concept theoretical controversial fields advances regenerative medicine gene therapy artificial intelligence
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Further Reading

What Happens When Everyone Realises We Can Live Much Longer? We May Find Out As Soon As 2025
Assuming rejuvenation research continues to progress, and is to some degree successful, a lot of our attitudes towards death will change.
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