English Motivations

English Motivations
Photo by Ben Mullins / Unsplash
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English learning
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As new English speakers, I’m sure you already know that it is a useful skill. However, it takes a lot of time and effort to progress to an advanced level. Here are a few reminders to help you stay motivated.

English is the language of international communication
Did you know that English is spoken by over 1.5 billion people worldwide and is the most widely used language in the world? That means that if you learn English, you can communicate with people from different countries and cultures. You can also access more information and entertainment on the internet, since most websites are in English.

English makes it easier to travel
If you love traveling like me, then you know how important it is to speak the local language. But sometimes it’s hard to learn every language of every place you want to visit. That’s why English is so handy: it is spoken in many countries around the world and is often used as a common language between people who do not speak each other’s native languages. So, if you learn English, you can explore more places and meet more people.

English can make you ‘smarter’
Yes, you read that right. Studies have shown that learning a second language can improve cognitive function, memory, and problem-solving skills. That means that learning English can make you smarter and more creative. It can also help you learn other languages faster and easier.

Studying English can help you get a job
In today’s globalized world, knowing English can give you an edge in the job market. English is the language of science, aviation, computers, diplomacy, and tourism. Many employers look for candidates who can speak English fluently and confidently. Learning English can also open up more opportunities for education and career advancement.

Learning English is fun
Last but not least, learning English is fun! There are so many ways to learn English that are enjoyable and engaging. You can watch movies and TV shows, listen

Vocabulary
Communication International Skill Progress Advanced Motivated Information Entertainment Travel Language Native Cognitive Function Memory Problem-solving Creative Globalized Science Aviation Computers Diplomacy Tourism Fluently Confidently Opportunities
Matching Game Communication International Skill Progress Advanced Motivated Information Entertainment Travel Language Native Cognitive Function Memory Problem-solving Creative Globalized Science Aviation Computers Diplomacy Tourism Fluently Confidently Opportunities
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Here are some tips for getting the most out of this site.


Beginners: My strategy is to first read the translation while listening to the audio. Then I listen to each sentence individually. After that, I practice saying the vocabulary words out loud. Finally, I listen to the whole text again without reading the translation. I don't try to remember or understand everything. I just let the language sink in as I gain more exposure. (Videos about Comprehensible Input)


Intermediate Learners: To gain some speaking practice, try opening the translation in your native language and then translate it back into the language you're learning. If you encounter any difficulties, you can refer to the transcripts.


Although you may use these lessons for short, intense study sessions, it's important for intermediate learners to engage in extensive listening and reading with simple books, TV shows, and podcasts as soon as possible.

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