Grit and Self-Control

For language learners, you might know about grit and self-control and how they're important for reaching your goals. But what are these traits exactly, and how are they different?

Grit and Self-Control
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Two Traits That Predict Achievement

For language learners, you might know about grit and self-control and how they're important for reaching your goals. But what are these traits exactly, and how are they different?

Grit means keeping your interest and effort in your goals for a long time. It's about not giving up and having strong passion. We can measure grit using the Grit Scale, which sees if you can stick to your goals over time.

Self-control, though, is about stopping yourself from doing things that feel good in the moment. It's about having discipline and saying no to impulses. We can test self-control with the Marshmallow Test, where kids choose between a small treat now or a bigger one if they wait.

The Marshmallow Test is a famous experiment that checks if a kid can wait for a bigger reward instead of taking a small one immediately. It helps us learn how well kids can control themselves and make good choices for the future.

Grit and self-control are connected but not the same. Grit is for long-term goals, while self-control is for short-term ones. Usually, people with grit also have self-control, but not always. You can be gritty but not have self-control.

As a language learner, having both grit and self-control can help you a lot. Grit keeps you motivated to become fluent, while self-control stops you from putting things off or losing to much time on other tasks likes games and social media.

Questions

  • What is the main topic of the article and the video?
  • What are the two traits that predict achievement according to the article?
  • How can we measure grit and self-control in people?
  • What is the difference between grit and self-control in terms of time span and motivation?
  • What is the benefit of having both grit and self-control for language learners?1
  • What is the name of the test that involves choosing between a small treat now or a bigger one later?
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