Work Satisfaction

Work Satisfaction
Photo by Avi Richards / Unsplash
The age gap in work satisfaction is a major factor in the post-pandemic work experience, according to a Pew Research Center survey. Workers 65 and older are more likely to be highly satisfied with their jobs, their co-workers, their duties, and their career prospects than workers 18 to 29. Workers under 50 are more likely to say their job is stressful and overwhelming. Some of the reasons for the gap are the higher pay, greater responsibilities, and more positive relationships that older workers enjoy, as well as the higher importance that older workers attach to their job or career.
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The age gap in work satisfaction is a major factor in the post-pandemic work experience, according to a Pew Research Center survey. Workers 65 and older are more likely to be highly satisfied with their jobs, their co-workers, their duties, and their career prospects than workers 18 to 29. Workers under 50 are more likely to say their job is stressful and overwhelming. Some of the reasons for the gap are the higher pay, greater responsibilities, and more positive relationships that older workers enjoy, as well as the higher importance that older workers attach to their job or career.
work satisfaction post-pandemic work experience highly satisfied co-workers duties career prospects stressful overwhelming higher pay greater responsibilities positive relationships attach to
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Work Satisfaction
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How happy are you at work? The answer may have to do more with your age, survey shows.
About half of American employees say they are very satisfied with their job amid an atmosphere of workplace disconnect, a new survey shows.
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